17 October 2014 | SPL News | Research News

 A point-of-use (POU) filter meets manufacturer’s claims for controlling Legionella for 62 days according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control released online.

October 17, 2014 (Pittsburgh)—A Legionella point-of-use (POU) filter meets manufacturer’s claims for controlling the bacteria for 62 days says according to the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control released online.

Special Pathogens Laboratory researchers, Janet E. Stout, PhD, and Julianne Baron, PhD, collaborated with a cancer center in Northwestern Pennsylvania to evaluate the next generation faucet filter called Q point (Pall Medical).

The 17-week study showed the filter controlled Legionella for 62 days—the first to surpass the 30-day life cycle of other POU filters currently on the market.

According to Dr. Stout, director of Special Pathogens Laboratory, “This new filter could provide a more convenient and cost-effective solution for infection prevention due to exposure to waterborne pathogens like Legionella and Pseudomonas for immune-compromised patients.”

In addition to controlling Legionella, the filter entirely eliminated heterotrophic plate count bacteria—total bacteria in water used as an indicator for biocide effectiveness and water quality—for the first two weeks.